The Class

Period 1 - TV Broadcast

The TV Broadcast class has a large responsibility to the school. The broadcasts that this class creates need to include all sorts of information about various school functions and policies, events that are yet to occur and video footage from events that have already occurred.


When you join this class, you sign up for action. Our broadcasts are aired live, not taped. There are very few schools that even attempt to do a daily broadcast, let alone doing it live every day. The Inside Scoop has aired daily since the 2004 – 2005 school year and, since then, we have aired over 1550 shows.


Each broadcast has about 12 people on the crew, but sometimes is up to 15 people. All jobs from production assistant to director are all student positions. Everybody in the class will eventually run every crew position during a broadcast. The only position that is not required of everyone is the news anchor position announcing the news during the broadcast. That position is auditioned and filled with the top readers from the class. While the anchor position is the one that the school sees the most, every position is essential for a good broadcast. It’s definitely a team effort every morning.

Do you want to be a part of that action?  If yes… then join the TV Broadcast class. You won’t regret it.


The Studio

Room 331

We’ve moved!!  We are now in our new TV studio that is three times larger than the old one.  And not only that, but the District is investing in our future.  They funded a major overhaul of our entire studio including a new anchor desk, a separate control room, new big screen TVs and all-new LED lighting.  And we’re now streaming our live, full high-definition broadcasts over the Internet so anybody in the world could watch our broadcasts if they’d like.


Check out the pictures on the right.


The Crew

Students Just Like You

The crew that creates The Inside Scoop broadcasts is just like you.  There are freshmen through seniors. They range from students still learning English to AP students.  But what they all have in common is a strong work ethic and the desire to make Century High School a better place for all students. 

We like to have fun but we take our responsibility, of informing the school about events and information they need to succeed, seriously.  Anybody who wants to try to be an anchor on the broadcasts is allowed to do it multiple times to get the hang of it.  Some students then decide that it’s not for them and just remain in the crew working behind the cameras.  And that’s perfectly fine.  Not everyone has what it takes to be “on air.”

Behind the camera is where the, sometimes chaotic,  action takes place.  Besides the two to three anchors you see as a viewer, there is an entire crew of seven to ten students working all the equipment that make the broadcasts work.  They include: the student director of the show, the technical director who switches from camera to camera using the video mixer, the student running the audio mixer and another student who operates the digital video computer that plays the show opening, ending credits and any recorded segment to be shown.  Another student prepares and monitors the cameras throughout the broadcast.  One student runs the teleprompter that the anchors use to read their script during the broadcast.  We have weather reports, a weekly College Corner on College Wednesdays and other special reports.

So you can see, there IS a place for you no matter what your technological skills may currently be. We'll teach you everything you need to know and you'll have fun learning it all.



Century High School - Santa Ana, CA